Any Given Child

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Metropolitan Youth Orchestra
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Primary Colours
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Indianapolis Museum of Art
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Dance Kaleidoscope
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Meet the New Class of Innovation School Leaders

Join The Mind Trust on October 25 to hear about unique school models and the launch of new Innovation Network Schools for the 2017-18 school year. Leaders will share details about support that promotes student success and the actions parents and community members can take to improve academic achievement throughout Indianapolis. The event will feature the leader of Edison School of the Arts, one of our nine Any Given Child Indy pilot schools. 

PANELISTS INCLUDE:

  • Brooke Beavers, School Leader, Ignite Achievement Academy at Elder Diggs
  • Shatoya Jordan, School Leader, Purdue Polytechnic High School
  • Nathan Tuttle, School Leader, Edison School of the Arts
  • Chrystal Westerhaus-Whorton, School Leader, Avondale Meadows Middle School

 ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

  • Doors open for sign-in at 5:15 p.m.
  • Program will begin at 5:30 p.m. and end at 7:00 p.m.
  • Food will be provided. RSVPs are strongly encouraged!

Fifth Annual IPS Fine Arts Fair

On Monday, October 16, the 5th annual Indianapolis Public Schools Fine Arts Fair will take place at Arlington High School. This free event, open to the public, is held each year to give teachers the opportunity to interact with representatives from local arts organizations and learn about the great arts programming Indianapolis has to offer. This year, the hour-long event will begin at 3pm and feature over 20 arts organizations, including Art With a Heart, Any Given Child Indy, the Indianapolis Symphony, and the Indiana State Museum, to name a few. For more information about the fair, contact David Newman (newmand@myips.org).

2017 #ArtsEdWeek Recap

Last week, the Indianapolis community celebrated National Arts in Education Week with numerous different events across the city. From a convening of professional arts educators at Edison School of the Arts and a meeting of the Any Given Child Indy Governing Council, to workshops at Clowes Memorial Hall and a jazz performance at IUPUI, community members celebrated the power of arts education in different ways throughout the week. Schools around the city celebrated the arts in education through arts enhanced and integrated lessons, and Any Given Child Indy released its 2017 Community Report. An inspiring event at the Indianapolis Art Center Thursday evening also featured seven short talks from community members highlighting the positive impacts of the arts, and Arts for Learning also hosted a professional development workshop for teaching artists. Needless to say, National Arts in Education Week 2017 was a success! 

Photo courtesy of James Whitcomb Riley School, one of the nine Any Given Child Indy pilot schools.

Photo courtesy of Edison School of the Arts, one of the nine Any Given Child Indy pilot schools.

Ploi Pagdalian challenges audience members to “Keep the arts weird” at JAMS: Perspectives in Arts Education at the Indianapolis Art Center.

Drink Tea and Support Arts Education

An Indianapolis tea shop has created a custom blend, loose-leaf tea to help support arts education. HoiTea ToiTea, located in Broad Ripple Village, offers tea blending classes, a cafe, and unique loose-leaf teas. The local business sells Nelson’s Teas, including our custom Any Given Child Indy blend: PB & Jams. A portion of each sale of this peanut-butter-and-jelly-flavored tea will directly support arts education in Indianapolis elementary schools through Any Given Child Indy. Click here to purchase your tea today to support arts education!

#ArtsEdWeek: An Art Teacher’s Journey From Clueless to Innovative

Jeremy Mallov, Amy Beverland Elementary

“What do you think, you are just going to be sitting there and a milkshake will fall in your lap?   ……Or a mars bar?”, said Professor Bill Itter, with his eyes bulging out with the excitement of a mad scientist. He was teaching us color theory at IU in 1999 and imploring us to work at our craft; to take it as seriously as he does. This was a lesson that took a little longer for me to learn in the craft of art teaching. When I first started out, I was convinced I was going to be a high school teacher. I worked a couple maternity leaves in high school and middle school, but I ended up at an elementary school; which turned out to be the absolute best thing for me. When I first started I was clueless as to what the younger kids were capable of, having the first graders color in coloring sheets and making crafty cut and glue projects for the older grades. The longer I worked with the younger kids, the more I realized they could truly accomplish. I experimented and learned and practiced and documented, and my lessons evolved. I began to start every day with a 5 minute life drawing; I would collect things: one day it would be an old toy, the next day it would be a pinecone or a thistle or an old pair of sunglasses; and the students would draw from life, adding shading and details. I began to treat it with the same seriousness my IU drawing professors did.

In college (and in life) I had a love of art history. I began to teach the 6-year-olds how to analyze works of art. Every day after the life-drawing time, we discussed an “artist in the spotlight.” A famous work of art poster was presented, and the kids spotted clues in the paintings, made connections to what was happening in history at the time, and began to learn to see the elements in the art as metaphors and symbolism. A dark cloud in the sky became a metaphor for how the artist felt worried about the future; a blue mountain became a symbol for the artist’s sadness. I also began to group the students’ projects into in-depth units of study.

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